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PRACTICAL GUIDE TO INSPECTION, TESTING AND CERTIFICATION OF ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS BY CHRISTOPHER KITCHER

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Different Types of Electrical Boxes in Your Home

Electrical boxes are critical components of your home’s electrical system. For DIYers, however, the sheer number of boxes available can be overwhelming. There are plastic and metal boxes; “new work” and “old work” boxes; round, square, and octagonal boxes; and boxes with load ratings for ceiling fans and heavy light fixtures.
You can find all the boxes you need for your home wiring project at large hardware stores and home centers. It is important to understand the differences so that you can choose the right boxes. There are many options available: size, shape, materials.
These are the types of electrical boxes that you should know.

Most electrical boxes are either metal or plastic. Metal boxes are typically made of steel. Plastic boxes are made from either PVC, fiberglass, or both. Weatherproof metal boxes for outdoor use are made mostly of aluminum.
Metal conduit must be used to run wiring from the electrical box. A metal box is needed to anchor the conduit, and the metal box can also be used to ground it. Non-metallic cables such as Type NMB (nonmetallic sheathed cables) can be used. You can either use metal boxes or plastic boxes as long as you secure the cable to the box using the appropriate clamp.
Modern wiring systems that use NM-B cable include a ground wire in the cable. This means the box is not part of the grounding system. Metal boxes, however, must be connected with the system ground. Usually, this is done with a pigtail.

CONTENT :

A Practical Guide for Inspection, Testing, and Certification of Electrical Installations
I’d like to dedicate this book and express my gratitude to my grandchildren for their kindness in leaving me alone when they asked.
Christopher Kitcher, Practical Guide to Testing and Inspection of Electrical Installations. Third Edition.
Christopher Kitcher has the right to be identified as the author of this work in accordance with sections 77 and 1978 of 1988’s Copyright, Designs, and Patents Act. All rights reserved. Without permission from the publishers, no part of this book may ever be reproduced, copied, or used in any way, electronic, mechanical, or otherwise, whether now or in the future. This publication contains information that is not intended to be relied upon by the author or publisher. Before taking any action or giving any interpretations that are not within the scope of a licensed professional’s practice, it is important for the reader to consult with a qualified professional. Trademark notice: Corporate or product names can be registered trademarks or trademarks. They are used for identification and explanation only and not to infringe.
List of figures xi Acknowledgements xv Introduction 1 Inspection of electrical installations 1 Chapter 1. The legal requirements 5 BS 7671 6 Part P of the Building Regulation Section 1. Design, installation, inspection, and testing 7 Section Section 3. Extensions, material modifications, and material changes of usage 8 Section. Information about other legislation 8 Completion with Building Regulations Part 9 Earthing, material alterations and material changes of use 11 Summary 12 Chapter 2. Types of certified? cation required to inspect and test electrical installations 13 Domestic installers certificate 13 Domestic electrical installation certificate 13 Part P domestic electrician certificate 13 Periodic inspection testing and reporting 14 Certificate required for inspecting and testing other domestic electrical installations 15 Chapter 3. Initial verification inspection 21 Periodic inspection 23 Extents and limitations 24 Visual inspection 25
35 Three-phase circuits/systems 39 Chapter 4 Periodic testing 41 Voltage drop in conductors 44 Testing of electrical installations 46 Safe isolation procedure 49 Testing of protective bonding conductors 53 Main protective bonding 53 Continuity of protective supplementary bonding conductors 61 Insulation resistance test 80 Low insulation resistance 81 Testing the whole installation 82 Testing of individual circuits 91 Polarity test 96 Polarity test on a radial circuit such as a cooker or immersion heater circuit 96 Polarity tester 105 105 35 Three-phase circuits/systems 39 Chapter 4. Periodic testing 49 Testing of protective bonds conductors 53 Main protective binding 53 Continuity protective supplementary bonding conductors 61% 61 Testing of electrical installations 46 Safety isolation procedure 89 Testing of insulation conductors 91 Polarity test 96 Testing of radial circuits such as cookers or immersion heaters 96 Testing with an earth loop resistance tester. 97 Live Polarity 103 Chapter 5. Earth electrode testing 105 Measurement with an earth fault path Circuit earth fault loop impedance Z114 Verification Z values 119

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